Children’s day (also known as Bal Divas) in India is celebrated every year on 14th of November to increase the awareness of people towards the rights, care and education of children. Children are the key of success and development of the country as they would lead their country in different and new technological way. They are adorable and shine same like the precious pearls. Children are the God gifts to their parents by the almighty. They are innocent, admirable, pure and loved by everyone.

    14th of November is the birth date of the first Indian prime minister, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. He became the prime minister of India just after the independence of India. The Children’s Day is celebrated every year to let the people specially parents aware about the importance of celebrating this day.

    CHILDREN’S DAY2Why Children’s Day is Celebrated

    The birthday of Chacha Nehru, a great Indian leader, is celebrated as Children’s Day. He worked great for the well being of children as well as youngsters after the independence of India. He worked so much for the education, progress and welfare of the children of India. He was very affectionate towards children and became famous as Chacha Nehru among them. For the progress and development of the youth of India, he had established various educational institutions such as Indian Institutes of Technology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences and Indian Institutes of Management.

    He made a five year plan which includes free primary education, free meals including milk to the school children in order to prevent children from malnutrition in India. The deep love and fervor of Chacha Nehru towards the children is the big reason of celebrating the Children’s Day at his birthday anniversary.

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    The childhood is the great moments in the life of everybody which should be necessarily given a right track to become successful in the future as an asset of the country. Without the right track they may miss living a good life. This can be done only by giving a right education, care and way to progress.

    About Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru

    Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru was a great leader of India and led the India as a first prime minister of India just after getting the independence in 1947. He was born on 4th of November in the year 1889 to the renowned lawyer, Motilal Nehru and Swaroop Rani in the Allahabad. Because of being very brilliant he was named as Jawaharlal. He got his later education from the England and after returning to India he started helping Indians and struggle for independence of India. After independence of the India he became the first prime minister of the India. He was also a great poet; some of his famous writings are ‘Glimpses of World History’,
    ‘Discovery of India’ and etc.

    He was really fond of children as well as roses that’s he said that children are like the buds of the garden. He said that children are the country’s actual strength as they would make developed society in future.

    Children’s Day Celebration

    Children’s day is celebrated every year with a lots organized programs including cultural and fun activities all over the India. Government and non government organizations, schools, NGOs, private bodies and other conducts variety of competitions as well as events for the children to let them known about their rights and make them happy and cheer. TV channels also demonstrate the interesting programs for the children on 14th of November.

    Parents take part in this event very enthusiastically to make their children happy; they distribute gifts, greeting cards to their sons and daughters. They go on picnic, long drive and enjoy the day with party.

    Jawaharlal Nehru was born in Allahabad, India in 1889. His father was a renowned lawyer and one of Mahatma Gandhi’s notable lieutenants. A series of English governesses and tutors educated Nehru at home until he was 16. He continued his education in England, first at the Harrow School and then at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he earned an honors degree in natural science. He later studied law at the Inner Temple in London before returning home to India in 1912 and practicing law for several years. Four years later, Nehru married Kamala Kaul; their only child, Indira Priyadarshini, was born in 1917. Like her father, Indira would later serve as prime minister of India under her married name: Indira Gandhi. A family of high achievers, one of Nehru’s sisters, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit, later became the first woman president of the UN General Assembly.

    Entering Politics

    In 1919, while traveling on a train, Nehru overheard British Brigadier-General Reginald Dyer gloating over the Jallianwala Bagh massacre. The massacre, also known as the Massacre of Amritsar, was an incident in which 379 people were killed and at least 1,200 wounded when the British military stationed there continuously fired for ten minutes on a crowd of unarmed Indians. Upon hearing Dyer’s words, Nehru vowed to fight the British. The incident changed the course of his life.

    This period in Indian history was marked by a wave of nationalist activity and governmental repression. Nehru joined the Indian National Congress, one of India’s two major political parties. Nehru was deeply influenced by the party’s leader, Mahatma Gandhi. It was Gandhi’s insistence on action to bring about change and greater autonomy from the British that sparked Nehru’s interest the most.

    The British didn’t give in easily to Indian demands for freedom, and in late 1921, the Congress Party’s central leaders and workers were banned from operating in some provinces. Nehru went to prison for the first time as the ban took effect; over the next 24 years he was to serve a total of nine sentences, adding up to more than nine years in jail. Always leaning to the left politically, Nehru studied Marxism while imprisoned. Though he found himself interested in the philosophy but repelled by some of its methods, from then on the backdrop of Nehru’s economic thinking was Marxist, adjusted as necessary to Indian conditions.

    Marching Toward Indian Independence

    In 1928, after years of struggle on behalf of Indian emancipation, Jawaharlal Nehru was named president of the Indian National Congress. (In fact, hoping that Nehru would attract India’s youth to the party, Mahatma Gandhi had engineered Nehru’s rise.) The next year, Nehru led the historic session at Lahore that proclaimed complete independence as India’s political goal. November 1930 saw the start of the Round Table Conferences, which convened in London and hosted British and Indian officials working toward a plan of eventual independence.

    After his father’s death in 1931, Nehru became more embedded in the workings of the Congress Party and became closer to Gandhi, attending the signing of the Gandhi-Irwin pact. Signed in March 1931 by Gandhi and the British viceroy Lord Irwin, the pact declared a truce between the British and India’s independence movement. The British agreed to free all political prisoners and Gandhi agreed to end the civil disobedience movement he had been coordinating for years.

    Unfortunately, the pact did not instantly usher in a peaceful climate in British-controlled India, and both Nehru and Gandhi were jailed in early 1932 on charges of attempting to mount another civil disobedience movement. Neither man attended the third Round Table Conference.(Gandhi was jailed soon after his return as the sole Indian representative attending the second Round Table Conference.) The third and final conference did, however, result in the Government of India Act of 1935, giving the Indian provinces a system of autonomous government in which elections would be held to name provincial leaders. By the time the 1935 act was signed into law, Indians began to see Nehru as natural heir to Gandhi, who didn’t designate Nehru as his political successor until the early 1940s. Gandhi said in January 1941, “[Jawaharlal Nehru and I] had differences from the time we became co-workers and yet I have said for some years and say so now that … Jawaharlal will be my successor.”

    Domestic Policy

    The importance of Jawaharlal Nehru in the context of Indian history can be distilled to the following points: he imparted modern values and thought, stressed secularism, insisted upon the basic unity of India, and, in the face of ethnic and religious diversity, carried India into the modern age of scientific innovation and technological progress. He also prompted social concern for the marginalized and poor and respect for democratic values.

    Nehru was especially proud to reform the antiquated Hindu civil code. Finally Hindu widows could enjoy equality with men in matters of inheritance and property. Nehru also changed Hindu law to criminalize caste discrimination.

    Nehru’s administration established many Indian institutions of higher learning, including the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, the Indian Institutes of Technology, and the National Institutes of Technology, and guaranteed in his five-year plans free and compulsory primary education to all of India’s children.

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