Blindfolded Muslim man with sign “Do you trust me?” hugs hundreds in Paris

    A Muslim man stood holding two signs near a mourning site at Place de la Republique in Paris, days after Islamic State terrorists attacked the city.

    STORY SNAPSHOT
    • Muslim blindfolds himself and stands among mourners in French capital 
    • Stands by placards saying: ‘I trust you. Do you trust me? If yes, hug me’
    • To his delight, dozens of tearful onlookers approach him one by one
    • He later thanks them all, saying: ‘I did this to send a message to everyone’ 

     

    “I’m a Muslim, but I’m told that I’m a terrorist” and “I trust you, do you trust me? If yes, hug me,” said the signs held up by the blindfolded man.

    Parisians didn’t let the man down. As a tearful crowd of mourners looked on, they approached the man, one by one, and embraced him, as a heartwarming YouTube video shows.

    The beleaguered European city is fraught with tension following terror attacks last Friday by the Islamic State that killed 130 people.

    After taking off his blindfold, the unnamed man thanked every one who gave him a hug. “I did this to send a message to everyone. I am a Muslim, but that doesn’t make me a terrorist. I never killed anybody. I can even tell you that last Friday was my birthday, but I didn’t go out,” he said.

    He further said that he feels deeply feel for all the victims’ families.

    “I want to tell you that “Muslim” doesn’t necessarily mean “terrorist”. A terrorist is a terrorist, someone willing to kill another human being over nothing. A Muslim would never do that. Our religion forbids it.’

    Similat videos went viral earlier this year, after the Charlie Hebdo attacks.

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